Shaun Loney

Ashoka Fellow
Canada
Fellow Since 2014
BUILD Inc.

In 2013, seven years after founding BUILD, I co-founded Aki Energy. This non-profit social enterprise employs First Nations communities in green energy and health food initiatives, and reaches more communities every year. The job now is to engage the new Canadian government so that we can remove the barriers preventing the re-emergence of the local economy.

After over a decade in the social purpose field, I have just written a book called An Army of Problem Solvers: Reconciliation and the Solutions Economy. A cross-Canada book tour starts this September. The book talks about problem solvers and what they can do to improve Canadian society. Why are there no gardens in Garden Hill First Nation? What does reconciliation really mean for Canada? In all of this there is a new role for government: it must shift from focusing on problems to focusing on problem solvers.

Related TopicsAdult education, Citizen / community participation, Crime prevention, Criminal justice, Employment, Civil rights, Housing, Urban development, Development & Prosperity, Civic Engagement, Peace & Harmonious Relations, Business & Social Enterprise, Human Rights & Equality

Citation

This profile was prepared when Shaun Loney was elected to the Ashoka Fellowship in 2014.
Introduction
Shaun Loney is using economic solutions based in the creation of local environmentally-friendly economies to bring employment and prosperity to Aboriginal peoples in Canada. He is targeting and engaging those most vulnerable to unemployment and supporting them to establish green solutions to pressing community problems. This win-win strategy is saving energy, bringing jobs and prosperity to the disadvantaged areas and empowering the Aboriginal community to become experts in the most cutting-edge energy-saving technologies.
The New Idea
The Problem
The Strategy
The Person

Updates

Shaun co-founded Aki Energy in 2013. This non-profit social enterprise creates employment in green energy and healthy food on First Nations. This work is annually expanding to more First Nations. The job now is to engage the new Canadian government so that barriers preventing the re-emergence of the local economy can be removed. Shaun has also written a book called An Army of Problem Solvers: Reconciliation and the Solutions Economy. A cross Canada book tour starts in September 2016. The book talks about problem solvers and what they can do to improve Canadian society. Why are there no gardens in Garden Hill First Nation? What does reconciliation really mean for Canada? In all of this, there is a new role for government: it must shift from focussing on problems to focusing on problem solvers.

More For You