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    For the past fifteen years, André Dupon has pioneered an alternative to the state-subsidized job training programs as a way to cope with France's deep-seated structural unemployment.

    Since the early 1980s Danielle Desguees has promoted a culture of entrepreneurship in France; an economy historically dominated by large firms and state enterprises.

    In response to the increasing industrialization of dairy farming in France, Fabrice is developing an entrepreneurial-driven small-scale farming alternative that reinvents the role of farmers keeps them in the agricultural and economic landscape. Through new modes of production and distribution that respect the environment and offer healthy milk, he positions dairy producers as wellness partners and reconnects them with consumers.

    Abdellah Aboulharjan is developing the skills of young people in segregated French suburbs to overcome the isolation and poverty of their neighborhoods and become successful entrepreneurs. By mentoring young people to develop their self-esteem and competence, he is creating new role models who are motivated to help rebuild their communities.

    Guilhem Chéron is creating a viable alternative to France’s industrial agricultural production system by using peer-to-peer marketing to fundamentally transform the economics of artisanal, environmentally sustainable food production. By reducing overhead costs and inefficiencies, Guihem is more than doubling the income suppliers receive for their products, first for suppliers in France and ultimately, across Western Europe.

    In response to increasing agricultural industrialization throughout France, Jérôme Deconinck has created the first agricultural land trust to mobilize the French population to preserve their agricultural heritage, and to promote the development of a more unified small-scale organic farming culture. He is demonstrating that another form of rural development—one that preserves landscapes, ensures custody of the environment, and maintains economic and social activities—is possible.

    Since the 1980s, Jean-Guy Henckel has worked to help the most excluded out of long-term unemployment. His innovative model trains them to produce high-value, organic agricultural products and organizes them into local “Cocagne Gardens,” organizations that market their packaged products to conscientious consumers, who in turn commit to buying their products every week. Beginning locally, Jean-Guy has expanded his approach to over 100 locations across France.

    Charles-Edouard Vincent promotes economic citizenship and new alliances to transform the way France responds to homelessness. Based on his work in Paris involving a wide range of stakeholders—from social organizations to corporations to the relevant French Ministries—he has invented a more effective and integrated model to engage homeless people through employment in order to tackle the deep-seated issues that initially led them to live on the streets.

    Nicolas Metro is redefining forest preservation as a human development issue, one that reaches far beyond environmental conservation. By positioning trees as central actors in creating economic opportunities and addressing social issues, Nicolas develops simple ways for companies and local communities to find common ground where entrepreneurial solutions are encouraged to flourish.

    Gilles Reydellet is making public services accessible to all, especially those geographically and socially excluded. Each year, his national network of highly effective platforms empowers 300,000 citizens to access and navigate their entitled services and rights. Gilles has also successfully engaged the government and public service companies by addressing the needs of their customers, and thereby, fulfilled their duty of equitable service.