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    In Brazil, the power of the media to celebrate the diversity of its population, particularly citizens of African descent, has rarely been harnessed. Paulo Rogerio Nunes is training black and white media professionals to foster interracial understanding in mass and alternative media.

    Socorro Guterres is putting Brazil's racial and cultural history in a positive light by changing the ways in which racial identity is treated in the public school system.

    A Brazilian who worked for years in conflict zones in Africa, Yvonne Bezerra recognized the developmental delays of Brazilian children in favelas as the same as those of African children raised in the presence of civil war. Yvonne heals these children’s trauma and integrates them back into the education system so that they can grow to become full members of society.

    Tiberio Alloggio is turning community-based ecotourism–an ideal medium for the preservation of indigenous culture and the conservation natural resources–into an effective economic solution for the river populations of the Amazon region.

    As the principal biologist and field organizer of an internationally supported effort to preserve the Spix's macaw, Marcos Da-Ré has developed a new approach to conservation that places heavy emphasis on the revitalization of the human communities that share habitats with endangered or threatened species' habitats.

    Thaise has developed an agrotourism model that brings new sources of income to rural families, prompts rural development, preserves local culture and community, and benefits tourists.

    Brazil's more than 200 indigenous peoples are largely voiceless and suffer from the country's worst living conditions. They are often perceived by mainstream society as unusual, primitive, or violent. Vincent Carelli battles such prejudice and discrimination with Video in the Villages, a program that empowers indigenous peoples and changes mainstream societal perceptions.

    Amid escalating violence and deepening poverty, youth in the slums of Brazil’s major cities find themselves surrounded by dangers and temptations, alienated from the rest of their society. Isabel Aparecida dos Santos, better known as Bel, enables these youth to lead their communities and gain access to services and opportunities that have remained out of reach for decades.

    Valdecir Pedreira do Nascimento is giving young domestic workers in Brazil the confidence and skills to stand up for their rights. Her comprehensive program integrates education, media, and the law in an effort to professionalize domestic work and open up opportunities for Brazilian youth.