296 résultats trouvés en 0.029 secondes.

Résultats de la recherche

    Contrary to many other parts of the world, such as the U.S., deaf people are highly excluded from French society and are often considered a burden. François Goudenove is changing this mindset. François is pioneering a society in which deaf people are full citizens, prejudices among the hearing towards the deaf have disappeared, and what was once considered a disability is an asset.

    John Paul Maunes is bringing to light the issue of sexual abuse among the Deaf community in the Philippines and using it to mobilize stakeholders across the law enforcement and social welfare spheres to institute new inclusive measures for the broader inclusion of the Deaf.

    Over the last twenty years, Jean-Marc Borello has developed and implemented new practices throughout the health and social services sector, and proven how innovation and competition in providing social services will create widespread social impact through economies of scale. His new way of delivering social services has influenced public policy, and his efforts are creating the legal and financial space for citizen organizations to thrive and compete with the business sector.

    Marie-Noëlle Besançon is revolutionizing long-term care for those suffering from mental illnesses in France by developing a network of low-cost, easily replicable non-medical living centers aimed at shifting the care of those suffering from psychiatric problems from the clinical realm to the citizen sector.

    Guillaume Bapst is revolutionizing the way low income households access and purchase food. In an attempt to improve the food distribution system in France, where access is often slow and bureaucratic, choices are limited, and quality and nutritional value are low, Guillaume has built a network of solidarity grocery shops.

    In many wildlife-protected areas in Uganda, communities and wildlife are sharing habitats, living closer and interdependent lives than ever before. Dr. Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka is linking Uganda's wildlife management and rural public health programs to create common resources that benefit both people and animals.

    Judi Aubel is improving the lives of women, children and families by empowering grandmothers, an abundant and underutilized cultural resource, to catalyze change in socio-cultural norms related to many issues, including girls’ education, early and forced marriage, teen pregnancy, female genital mutilation, maternal and child health/nutrition and intergenerational communication.

    Anne Roos-Weil has piloted a cost-effective medical system to drastically reduce the number of African children and mothers who die from benign diseases. Combining simple skills and cell phones, she systematically collects basic health data and transfers it electronically to local medical staff to inform proper treatment or medical action.

    There are only 2,000 neurologists to deal with over a million aging people with cognitive diseases and no history of managed care in France, which leads to huge bottlenecks in the healthcare system and terrible social and psychological consequences for patients and their families.

    For Ryadh Sallem, being disabled is a relative concept—defined as much by a state of mind and societal prejudice as by physical incapacity. As every individual faces limitations but also possesses unique talents, Ryadh is redefining the concept of what it means to be “handicapped” by bringing the non-disabled to the world of the disabled and is working to eliminate exclusion.