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    Maria Aparecida Silva Bento ("Cida") established a center to work with labor unions, employers and the government to help them recognize racism and promote equal opportunity. Her effectiveness results from a unique combination of high technical competence and close philosophical and actual affinity with Brazil's awakening Black Consciousness social movement.

    Dr. Pierre Foldes is developing an unprecedented holistic approach in a unique, free and accessible center, to efficiently overcome the issues these women are confronted with – medical, psychological, legal, and social – when they are ready to break the cycle of domestic violence. His solution is conceived as an ecosystem of cooperation between the (doctors, police, justice, small shops) to design and scale new ways of detecting and supporting these women until they are totally out of danger.

    To combat racism in Brazil, Regina dos Santos is using her training and experience in Black History to increase the participation of black people in television and other visual arts.

    Tourism is a double-edged sword. On the one hand it brings people and business to economically starved regions, creating jobs and wealth. On the other, much of that wealth is concentrated in the hands of business owners and comes at the expense of severe environmental and cultural degradation.

    In Brazil, the power of the media to celebrate the diversity of its population, particularly citizens of African descent, has rarely been harnessed. Paulo Rogerio Nunes is training black and white media professionals to foster interracial understanding in mass and alternative media.

    Socorro Guterres is putting Brazil's racial and cultural history in a positive light by changing the ways in which racial identity is treated in the public school system.

    Ruth Gelehrter da Costa Lopes, a São Paulo social psychologist, has started Brazil's first public psychological clinic for the elderly, a burgeoning population ignored by Brazilian professionals and institutions.

    Brazil's more than 200 indigenous peoples are largely voiceless and suffer from the country's worst living conditions. They are often perceived by mainstream society as unusual, primitive, or violent. Vincent Carelli battles such prejudice and discrimination with Video in the Villages, a program that empowers indigenous peoples and changes mainstream societal perceptions.

    Years before international media showed the world shocking images of Amazon Indians suffering and dying from contact with white invaders, Marcio Santilli, 35, has championed indigenous peoples' rights in Brazil. That is why as a federal deputy he was named to the congressional commission on Indian affairs.It was an important moment for indigenous peoples in Brazil, because the Congress was beginning to formulate a new, democratic national constitution.