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    Marginalization is one of the main factors contributing to the cycles of unemployment, violence, and social unrest in impoverished urban and suburban areas. Allaoui Guenni is using sports as a catalyst to bring down the walls surrounding local populations, build bridges to employment and social integration, facilitate conflict resolution, and ultimately pacify relationships within society.

    In response to the increasing industrialization of dairy farming in France, Fabrice is developing an entrepreneurial-driven small-scale farming alternative that reinvents the role of farmers keeps them in the agricultural and economic landscape. Through new modes of production and distribution that respect the environment and offer healthy milk, he positions dairy producers as wellness partners and reconnects them with consumers.

    Guilhem Chéron is creating a viable alternative to France’s industrial agricultural production system by using peer-to-peer marketing to fundamentally transform the economics of artisanal, environmentally sustainable food production. By reducing overhead costs and inefficiencies, Guihem is more than doubling the income suppliers receive for their products, first for suppliers in France and ultimately, across Western Europe.

    In response to increasing agricultural industrialization throughout France, Jérôme Deconinck has created the first agricultural land trust to mobilize the French population to preserve their agricultural heritage, and to promote the development of a more unified small-scale organic farming culture. He is demonstrating that another form of rural development—one that preserves landscapes, ensures custody of the environment, and maintains economic and social activities—is possible.

    Gilles Reydellet is making public services accessible to all, especially those geographically and socially excluded. Each year, his national network of highly effective platforms empowers 300,000 citizens to access and navigate their entitled services and rights. Gilles has also successfully engaged the government and public service companies by addressing the needs of their customers, and thereby, fulfilled their duty of equitable service.

    The global food supply chain is broken. Low-cost food is subsidized through a process of externalizing costs that serves only the largest multinational organizations and creates negative environmental and social impacts. Small producers around the world are seeing their way of living jeopardized. Consumers find it harder and harder to know about the source and nutrition of the foods they buy.

    Over the last twenty years, Jean-Marc Borello has developed and implemented new practices throughout the health and social services sector, and proven how innovation and competition in providing social services will create widespread social impact through economies of scale. His new way of delivering social services has influenced public policy, and his efforts are creating the legal and financial space for citizen organizations to thrive and compete with the business sector.

    Marie-Noëlle Besançon is revolutionizing long-term care for those suffering from mental illnesses in France by developing a network of low-cost, easily replicable non-medical living centers aimed at shifting the care of those suffering from psychiatric problems from the clinical realm to the citizen sector.

    Cristina Liamzon is building a global community of empowered Filipino migrant workers through a leadership and education program that encourages them to become drivers of change in the Philippines or in their host countries.

    Nelsa Nespolo is creating a “fair chain” model that brings workers in the supply chain into ownership and management responsibilities—giving them greater control over their livelihoods.