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    Get to know our Fellows in Switzerland!

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    In Switzerland, Ashoka nominates one or two social entrepreneurs every year to be part of our fellowship programme. Ashoka fellows are visionaries who develop innovative solutions that fundamentally change how society operates.

    Mark Edwards: Upstream USA

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    In response to the increasing industrialization of dairy farming in France, Fabrice is developing an entrepreneurial-driven small-scale farming alternative that reinvents the role of farmers keeps them in the agricultural and economic landscape. Through new modes of production and distribution that respect the environment and offer healthy milk, he positions dairy producers as wellness partners and reconnects them with consumers.

    Simon Houriez is establishing a common ground for learning for both deaf and hearing members of society, and by doing so, is fostering equal citizenship. He refuses to admit that for the deaf to be educated and recognized in French society they must adjust to the communication paradigms and the education system of the hearing.

    Contrary to many other parts of the world, such as the U.S., deaf people are highly excluded from French society and are often considered a burden. François Goudenove is changing this mindset. François is pioneering a society in which deaf people are full citizens, prejudices among the hearing towards the deaf have disappeared, and what was once considered a disability is an asset.

    John Paul Maunes is bringing to light the issue of sexual abuse among the Deaf community in the Philippines and using it to mobilize stakeholders across the law enforcement and social welfare spheres to institute new inclusive measures for the broader inclusion of the Deaf.

    Guillaume Bapst is revolutionizing the way low income households access and purchase food. In an attempt to improve the food distribution system in France, where access is often slow and bureaucratic, choices are limited, and quality and nutritional value are low, Guillaume has built a network of solidarity grocery shops.

    Judi Aubel is improving the lives of women, children and families by empowering grandmothers, an abundant and underutilized cultural resource, to catalyze change in socio-cultural norms related to many issues, including girls’ education, early and forced marriage, teen pregnancy, female genital mutilation, maternal and child health/nutrition and intergenerational communication.

    For Ryadh Sallem, being disabled is a relative concept—defined as much by a state of mind and societal prejudice as by physical incapacity. As every individual faces limitations but also possesses unique talents, Ryadh is redefining the concept of what it means to be “handicapped” by bringing the non-disabled to the world of the disabled and is working to eliminate exclusion.

    EIR Lessons in perspective: A Conversation with EIR alumni Juan Loraschi

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    For information about the Executive in Residence program visit the